Menu

Transforming waste into art pieces

In: CIEL Group | December 2017

Ethical & Sustainable



What if old hotel uniforms were transformed into art pieces? Showing much creativity in its approach, Sun Resorts has partnered with the Fashion & Design lnstitute (FDI) to launch the Sew Chic Project. The group, managing five hotels in Mauritius and in the Maldives, has donated old staff uniforms to FDI students. Kanuhura also participates in this initiative by donating its old uniforms to local institutions and local communities in Maldives.



Valuing seemingly waste

To get rid of their old uniforms, hotels, like any other businesses, have basically two options: dumping or burning. However, both methods have irreversible impact on the environment since one  would increase disposal in landfills while the other would have caused air pollution. The Sew Chic Project takes the challenge to transform waste into an asset, since these old uniforms are converted into valuable raw materials.


Promoting local talents

After several hours of work, thanks to gifted students, the raw material is transformed into art pieces. The project indeed serves as a platform to promote local talents. ln addition to providing the uniforms to the students, Sun has also organised an exhibition in Ambre last year to showcase the art pieces and thus takes a social dimension through local community engagement.


Doing more with less

Launched last year, this project is part of the SUN CARE Programme which ensures the sustainable activities across the resorts. Consisting of a number of initiatives, this comprehensive programme has identified three axes of intervention: economic, social and environmental. The Sew Chic Project covers all three axes. Through this initiative, Sun Resorts promotes best practices as well as excellence and maintains highest ethical standards.

Following this first phase, the project will be rolled out to bring it to the next level. All avenues will be explored to develop new products, such as gift bags, that could later be mass-produced.




Follow Our Stories